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Archive: Equipment

 

A Locked Case      What kind of lock satisfies the law?

Joe didn't trust Billy, Jr., the kid never seemed to hold a job very long, but the Smiths were such good people, Joe could not say no. Joe's shotgun and some other rifles were in a locked glass case in the living room. It might be better, Joe thought, if those guns were not so visible to Billy. Joe put the guns in his bedroom closet along with his coin collection and other valuables. For good measure, he put a lot of other things on top of the guns so that someone looking in the closet would not see them. Then he locked ...

 

Concealed Carry       Some legal concerns reaarding open and concealed carry.

In the so called "open carry" states, the law says you can carry a gun if it is carried openly, sort of like the cowboys did. Sometime local law will arrest people who carrying in that manner because they do not want people to carry guns. Unless the gun owner is hunting, fishing, engaged in some deep woods activity or business related security work, the police say the gun owner is disturbing the peace. ...

 

Alternatives to Lethal Force: A Phaser Set on Stun?        Tasers, stun guns and other options.

"I've been carrying a concealed firearm for a couple of years now with my permit, but I think maybe I should carry something for those times when it's a 'harassment' confrontation, and not a lethal situation. I've thought about blackjacks, expanding batons, spray, and Kubotons. I don't want something that's going to be so heavy that it's cumbersome to drag around all the time, but I want something that will be effective. Also, if I have to use it, and I wind up in court, I don't want whatever item it is to make me look like a bad guy for using it. ...

 

Defending Ourselves As We Mature     Especially for senior citizens

It is one of the unchanging truths of the world that we change as we mature. Of course, not everyone matures at the same rate, or has the same issues along the way. Most of us expect that as a result of better nutrition, better medical care, and a better lifestyle, we will "age better" than our parents or grandparents did. Even if that is true, and I hope it is for you, there are some issues and concerns that are common to many mature people,  and may affect one's ability to protect oneself, with or without a gun. Let's look at a few.. 


 Owning and Carrying Non-FIrearm Weapons      Do you risk falling afoul of nearly incomprehensible laws

Firearms are not the only regulated weapon that you might carry or own. Most states have statutes regarding knives, bludgeoning weapons, and a variety of other hand-to-hand items. Your firearms permit is normally specific to firearms, not non-firearm weapons. Unfortunately, state non-firearm weapons laws are often cluttered with undefined terms and interpreted in ways that can confuse even experienced attorneys and can be a legal minefield for those who want to carry a non-firearm defensive weapon, or who own, carry, or transport bladed or bludgeoning instruments for martial arts, historical recreation, as curios or part of collection, or for religious reasons.

 

Carrying While Carrying     Advice for pregnant women.

There are two primary considerations to carrying while carrying: comfort and access. Either one without the other is an unacceptable solution.  We explore some options, and remind "NO live fire practice due to lead poisoning danger." ...

Guns in Purses, Yes or No?     Pros and cons of a very common practice.

The one issue that comes up faster than any other, as far as concealed carry for women is concerned, is "Is it OK to carry my gun in my purse?"  It is a legitimate question, and one that deserves a careful answer. Any method of concealed carry that is going to work, day in and day out, must satisfy three criteria: It must conceal the gun, it must be accessible, and it must be comfortable. Any method of carry is a compromise among these three requirements; personal circumstances dictate the priorities, so they will vary from person to person, and from time to time. ...

 

Two Fingers are Not Better than One        Heavy revolver triggers can be dangerous.

 A while ago I got the following inquiry: "[a cop] called me today to ask why a small statured female cop should not be allowed to use two fingers (presumably the index fingers of both hands) to pull the trigger. … What is your view on this issue?" ...